Sheridan College and the Schlegel-UW Research Institute for Aging continue innovative arts and aging partnership

Sheridan and the Schlegel-UW Research Institute for Aging (RIA) are thrilled to announce the five-year extension of an innovative research partnership. The continuation of this commitment will support the ground-breaking research work of Kate Dupuis, Schlegel Innovation Leader in Arts and Aging. Dupuis is also a Professor in the Faculty of Applied Health and Community Studies at Sheridan.

This commitment will support a range of research activities related to the creative and performing arts in older adults. Over the next five years, Dupuis will continue to contribute significantly to arts and aging research out of the Sheridan Centre for Elder Research, studying how participation in the creative and performing arts can serve to enhance the health and well-being of older adults and those who care for them.

“It’s such a privilege to continue our work with Dr. Dupuis and renew our partnership with the RIA. Dr. Dupuis’ work has helped bridge the gap between academia, industry and community. She has also been able to showcase and profile the arts as a health promotion strategy for older adults, demonstrating the Centre for Elder Research’s long-standing commitment to, and leadership in, this space. We’re excited to see what the next five years will bring.” – said Dr. Lia Tsotsos, Director of the Centre for Elder Research.

Dupuis started in 2017 as the Schlegel Innovation Leader, the first such position of this nature at Sheridan and the RIA. Dupuis’ research delves into the personal and circumstantial characteristics of individuals who are drawn to participate in the arts, and identifying the physical, psychological, social, and systemic barriers to participation.

“The RIA is pleased to continue this partnership with the Sheridan Centre for Elder Research.” said Josie d’Avernas, RIA Executive Director. “RIA is home to many world-class leaders in aging research and we are happy to support the innovative work being done by Kate Dupuis. Her research highlights the value of artistic expression as we age, and the role of the arts in connecting generations. We look forward to five more years of collaboration.”

This partnership (initially created by Pat Spadafora, former Director of the Centre for Elder Research) will foster the continued advancement of the Canadian research landscape in the domains of arts, health, and aging.